Ducati Supersport horn

When I bought my first new bike back in 1977 at the age of 18, I had my fathers words in my mind, “Make sure that every bike that you own has good lights and a good horn”. That BMW R75/7 had both.

Here we are 40 years later and I have just bought the new Ducati Supersport 939. This bike comes with some decent lighting as standard and has the LED strip for daytime conspicuity, nothing needed there then. The horn on the other hand was like Mickey Mouse farting! It could not be heard over the sound of the engine on tickover. Bikers who have visited this area will know that there is one huge danger on the roads in this part of France – Belgian car drivers. A good horn stops them in their tracks.

The horn of choice was the DENALI Soundbomb Split. I went for the split as there is not much room on the Supersport and with the split I could use both sides of the bike. Here is the kit:

The part on the left is the dual tone air trumpet, the fitted aluminium bracket is my construction – more of that later, centre is the compressor and on the right is the air hose to connect the two. The kit also came with a relay which I threw away and fitted a better quality one.

The trumpet was fitted under the left fairing fillet panel with the home made bracket.

These are the two bolts that hold the fillet panel on, remove them and pull the panel rearwards and it comes off.

The following two pictures show the bracket that I made from aluminium to hold the trumpet. This is bolted with a rubber packer so that it is insulated for vibration from the bracket.

The bracket holds the trumpet out of sight below the fillet panel, and attaches to the top radiator mount and the bolt that holds the existing horn in place. Here it is in position.

The trumpet must have some clearance around it so that it when it is in operation it is not able to touch anything. The original horn is left in place and left connected, it can be seen in front (right in picture) of the bracket leg.

The compressor was fitted on the other side of the bike, also on a bracket bolted to the top radiator mount. The radiator expansion tank hose is a hindrance to using an allen key on this bolt, so a hex head bolt was fitted.

The relay was operated by piggyback wires from the original horn. The reason for keeping that horn is that the electrical system will not operate the Soundbomb alone as it draws too much power and the bike thinks that there is something wrong. The compressor is wired to the battery through the relay and a 25 amp fuse. Note the carbon fibre mounting bracket on this side. I have to thank my aircraft career for the ability to make brackets!

The horn button on the bike is now a thing to be wary of, I would not use it to say hello to someone on the side of the road as the ground shakes when it is pressed. Watch out Belgian drivers!

Exhaust valve.

It seems that many new bikes are fitted with a flapper valve in the exhaust these days, Ducati being one. If you look back through the posts you will find that I took the exhaust valve motor out of my 848 and fitted a little box to fool the ECU into thinking that it was still fitted. Well I have another little box the same.

This picture shows the oil filter from a previous post but the exhaust valve gubbins is in the same area. The valve itself is under the triangular cover to the rear of the green circle, it is held on with three bolts. Just under the front of the green circle, the cable that runs to the motor, which is in the lower front of the fairing. is just showing, 

First thing that I did was to take a short video of the motor with the bike running to see when it was closing the valve.

This actually proves nothing apart from the fact that it is working. In my  view anything that is making a restriction in an exhaust system for no known reason is a waste of time, and does nothing for efficiency.

The motor and cable has been totally removed along with the brackets. This saves a bit of weight, not that I’ll ever notice while riding, and gets rid of that ugly cable hanging down. The valve itself is still in the exhaust but is wirelocked in the open position.

Time will tell if the modification has any effect on the way the bike runs, or on economy. It is very easy to reinstall everything if needed.

All that I need now is a spare exhaust box to see how easy it will be to cut open, remove the catalytic converter, and weld closed again. That is one modification that I know from experience makes the machine more economical and boosts mid range torque.

 

Progress.

There will be two posts today, this is the first.

The Supersport is going strong, I am trying to take a decent length ride everyday and with new oil and more kilometers on the engine is feeling great. The fuel consumption is averaging between 4.2 and 4.3 litres per 100 kilometers, that works out at 24 kms per litre for those who measure in that way. The engine feels smoother and the torque from 3000 rpm can now really be appreciated. I have no major mirror vibration as some owners seem to have, but I blame that on sloppy running in procedure. Test bikes will probably never have been run in, and Ducati’s own recommendations can be improved upon. The manual tell you to keep the revs below 5500 rpm for the first 1000 kms and then 6000 rpm for the next 1000 kms. I have always prefered to build those revs up gradually and never exceeded 3000 during the first slow 150 kms. From there it was built up to 5000 rpm at the 1000 km point and now it will build up to the 2000 km point.

Some numpties on a Supersport forum took great pleasure in telling me how I was running my bike in the wrong way, but they are the ones complaining of vibrations. It is my bike and I will run it in the same way that I have run all of my other new bikes in.

Having said that there is little point in using much more than 5000 rpm as that is about 125 kmh in top and on the roads around here that is plenty.

I attached one of my Gopro cameras to a chest mount and made a little video yesterday, best viewed in HD on a TV.

The first pictures.

Today is Sunday. I collected the bike on Thursday in the rain and it has rained since apart from a brief spell yesterday afternoon. My wife and I pulled the Supersport out of the garage to clean it and take some pictures. While it has been in the garage I have spent some time going through the various settings and modes on the bikes electronics and display, and have removed the rear footrests as they will only be needed when a certain person visits from the UK. I have also cut down the large rear number plate hanger that is too big for our French number plates.

Here are the pictures:

The front of the bike looks quite pretty while at rest, I thought that the 848 was a piece of art, but this one is too.Then when the ignition is turned on the daytime running light illuminates. It is an array of LEDs and makes the bike look more aggressive.

These two side views show the lines of the bike, note that without the black rear footrests and their hangers above the exhausts, the lines are a bit cleaner.

It looks like it should be quite an aggressive (uncomfortable) riding position from this angle, but that is not the case, it is very comfortable. The long part that holds the rear number plate will be changed for a shorted on in due course.

The business end. This instrument has a wealth of information. The two boxes on the bottom left and right can be scrolled though to show average speeds, fuel consumption, distance left on fuel in the tank and much much more.

The selectable riding modes, “Sport”, “Touring” and “Urban” are also selectable and programmable to give various throttle responses, engine power settings, traction control and ABS settings. If it sounds complicated then it is not too bad once you have read the huge instruction manual.

More to come.

The next Generation

So far this blog has covered three Ducati models, the ST2, 848 and the 250 mk3. There is another blog out there in the ether about the restoration of my 1991 BMW K100RS 16v.

Times are changing though, the 848 will be going. We still have the other bikes and have no intention of selling them at the moment, but it is time for a change. We have ordered a new 2017 Ducati Supersport 939.

The 848 has been one of the nicest bikes to ride that I have ever owned, and I started in 1975 with a Honda 250K4, a Honda CJ360T, a Suzuki T500 and a brand new BMW R75/7 shortly afterwards, and I had all of those bikes together too. Everything that I have owned has been a tourer or an all rounder bike and the closest thing to a sports bike was the BMW R1100S, we had two, one for me and one for my wife. I bought the 848 just for a bit of fun and what a bike. Not too comfortable – my wife only tried it once, but a delight to drive as long as it was not in town. Smiles per mile were ample, screaming around country roads with the loud exhaust was a real hoot, but things have to change sooner or later.

I have some plans for the Supersport, but I will not go into them yet and will drip feed them as posts with plenty of pictures and videos as I usually do.

I have not ordered the S version of the bike as I cannot see that I need any of the toys that it has fitted. The quick shifter on the S might be fun, but is not needed for my sort of riding, the expensive suspension might be something to brag about, but I don’t need to brag and I have no intention of going on a track, so the non S is what I chose. If my wife also likes riding it then she will have one too, but she will have the S because she wants the white paintwork that is only available on that version.